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Book Quotes - Alexander Hamilton 

Hamilton.

I saw the play in LA. Loved it. How very interesting, I thought as a creative person, how Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow inspired a whole show for Broadway. I must read it. 

Read it, I did!
Some of the many quotes I saved in my trusty Kindle:


"In all probability, Alexander Hamilton is the foremost political figure in American history who never attained the presidency, yet he probably had a much deeper and more lasting impact than many who did."


“Believe me love is doubly sweet / In wedlock’s holy bands.” ~ A. Hamilton poetry at 17


"See thy wretched helpless state and learn to know thyself. . . . Despise thyself and adore thy God. . . . O ye who revel in affluence see the afflictions of humanity and bestow your superfluity to ease them. . . . Succour the miserable and lay up a treasure in heaven." ~ A. Hamilton


"His chum at King’s [College], Robert Troup, was convinced that Hamilton’s religious practice was driven by more than duty. He 'was attentive to public worship and in the habit of praying on his knees night and morning. . . . I have often been powerfully affected by the fervor and eloquence of his prayers. He had read many of the polemical writers on religious subjects and he was a zealous believer in the fundamental doctrines of Christianity.'"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


To be continued!

Book Quotes - A Moveable Feast 

Sub-heading: Books I've read. 

This installment of "Book Quotes" is brought to you by "A Moveable Feast"  by Ernest Hemingway

This book made a great souvenir as I was walking the streets of Paris in May/June of 2017. I purchased it at the infamous "Shakespeare and Company" book store in the City of Lights.

 

 

 

 

 

 


On writing in Paris...

Sadness of Fall, but there's always Spring...

This was basically our same path we walked every day down to the city sights...

"...I could never be lonely along the river [Seine]"

Book Quotes - The Monuments Men 

Sub-heading: Books I've read. 

This installment of "Book Quotes" is brought to you by "The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves, and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History"  by Robert M. Edsel and Bret Witter

Ever since reading that George Patton book, I suddenly find myself with somewhat of an interest in WW2 history. The basic gist of this book: soldiers on a mission to save the great works of art stolen by the Nazis.

***************************************

"It is amazing how the world can change, he thought, during the life span of a fruitcake."

"I believe that all this loveliness showing through the rubble and wreck are just foreshadowings of the joys we were made for.”

Baseball:

"During the Bulge, Posey told him, the Germans had parachuted troops behind Allied lines dressed in American uniforms. The only way to find them out was to ask questions on strictly American topics, like baseball. The Germans were always clueless."

New York City:

"To see a painting of this quality leaning against the wall of a command post amid the bullets and the grime was to understand that great works of art were part of the world. They were objects. They were fragile. They were lonely, small, unprotected. A child on a playground looks strong, but a child wandering alone down Madison Avenue in New York City—that’s terrifying."

It was so cool reading this book and THEN taking a trip to Paris, staying in the Latin Quarter! :

"First Lieutenant James Rorimer rode his bicycle to Rose Valland’s apartment in the fifth arrondissement, an ancient section of Paris known as the Latin Quarter. The quarter had been popular with tourists before the war, but few tourists, Rorimer suspected, had ever visited Valland’s middle-class residential area, a lonely and secluded stretch just beyond the site of a massive fire started by German bombardment in August 1944."

 

"Sometimes, Rose Valland thought as the snows of December 1944 floated down around her, your destiny is thrust upon you." (Photo on left - Translation: "Hero of the Arts")

 

"Destiny is not one push, she thought as she waited to cross a quiet street on that cold Paris evening years later, but a thousand small moments that through insight and hard work you line up in the right direction, like a magnet does with metal shavings."

Book Quotes - A Farewell To Arms * The Sun Also Rises 

In my travels I have been to the Hemingway House in Key West and the Hemingway Memorial in Sun City, Idaho, and as well as even walking the streets of Paris where Ernest walked and lived and wrote.

I am now on a Hemingway kick, peppering his writings in between my other reads of fiction and non-fiction alike. As always, food for the songwriting soul.

 

On Writing:

"When I was growing up, my parents always told me that my grandfather said write about what you know."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have spent over a week walking up to 15 miles a day on the streets of Paris in late Spring, hence this passage of text was interesting enough for me to highlight it and many others like it, on my kindle. Guess you had to be there. ;)

**  "I went out onto the sidewalk and walked down toward the Boulevard St. Michel, passed the tables of the Rotonde, still crowded, looked across the street at the Dôme, its tables running out to the edge of the pavement. Some one waved at me from a table, I did not see who it was and went on. I wanted to get home. The Boulevard Montparnasse was deserted. Lavigne’s was closed tight, and they were stacking the tables outside the Closerie des Lilas. I passed Ney’s statue standing among the new-leaved chestnut-trees in the arc-light. There was a faded purple wreath leaning against the base. I stopped and read the inscription: from the Bonapartist Groups, some date; I forget. He looked very fine, Marshal Ney in his top-boots, gesturing with his sword among the green new horse-chestnut leaves. My flat was just across the street, a little way down the Boulevard St. Michel."

** "It is awfully easy to be hard-boiled about everything in the daytime, but at night it is another thing."

** "Brett looked at me. “I was a fool to go away,” she said. “One’s an ass to leave Paris.”

** "I drank a bottle of wine for company. It was a Château Margaux. It was pleasant to be drinking slowly and to be tasting the wine and to be drinking alone. A bottle of wine was good company."

** "Everything is on such a clear financial basis in France. It is the simplest country to live in. No one makes things complicated by becoming your friend for any obscure reason. If you want people to like you you have only to spend a little money. I spent a little money and the waiter liked me. He appreciated my valuable qualities. He would be glad to see me back. I would dine there again some time and he would be glad to see me, and would want me at his table. It would be a sincere liking because it would have a sound basis. I was back in France."

And finally...

** "I hated to leave France. Life was so simple in France."

I had to leave....Adieu dès maintenant!

 

Book Quotes - Custom of the Country 

I am so glad to finish my iPad book "Custom of the Country" by Edith Wharton (not that I didn't enjoy it) so I can actually hold my next read, a real live book - binding, pages turning in anticipation of the next - with my own two hands!

NEW YORK 

“It's dirty and ugly—all the towns we've been to are disgustingly dirty. I loathe the smells and the beggars. I'm sick and tired of the stuffy rooms in the hotels. I thought it would all be so splendid—but New York's ever so much nicer!"

"Not New York in July?"

"I don't care—there are the roof-gardens, anyway; and there are always people round. All these places seem as if they were dead. It's all like some awful cemetery.”
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“She was aware of the fading of the summer light outside, of the movements of her maid, who was laying out her dinner-dress in the room beyond, and of the fact that the tea-roses on her writing-table, shaken by Van Degen's tread, were dropping their petals over Ralph's letter, and down on the crumpled telegram which she could see through the trellised sides of the scrap-basket.”
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“The smothered springs of life were bubbling up in Ralph, and there were days when he was glad to wake and see the sun in his window, and when he began to plan his book, and to fancy that the planning really interested him. He could even maintain the delusion for several days—for intervals each time appreciably longer—before it shrivelled up again in a scorching blast of disenchantment. The worst of it was that he could never tell when these hot gusts of anguish would overtake him. They came sometimes just when he felt most secure, when he was saying to himself: "After all, things are really worth while—”
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WRITING (Written about me? L.O.L.)

“...after nights of brooding he made a dash at it, and wrote an opening chapter that struck him as not too bad. In the exhilaration of this first attempt he spent some pleasant evenings revising and polishing his work; and gradually a feeling of authority and importance developed in him. In the morning, when he woke, instead of his habitual sense of lassitude, he felt an eagerness to be up and doing, and a conviction that his individual task was a necessary part of the world's machinery. He kept his secret with the beginner's deadly fear of losing his hold on his half-real creations if he let in any outer light on them; but he went about with a more assured step, shrank less from meeting his friends, and even began to dine out again, and to laugh at some of the jokes he heard.”

Excerpts From: Wharton, Edith. “The Custom of the Country.” iBooks. 
This material may be protected by copyright.

 

ThrowBackThursday - Clapton * The Autobiography 

ThrowBackThursday Post- Looking back on a blog post of recent yesteryear (and bringing it over from the old website for further reference).

Felt it was time to read a biography (I like to mix it up a little).  Better still, an autobiography.  Can't say I'm a bona fide "fan" of Eric Clapton (someone I can't miss in concert), but an interesting read nonetheless.  Autobiographies are cool -  like the-author-is-sitting-right-there-with-you-in-the-airport, coffee shop, comfy-couch at home, or wherever-cool.

The Road to EscondidoIn the process, a couple of records have piqued my interest. The first is Road To Escondido whereby Mr.Clapton moved in with J.J. Cale for a week at his house in the hills of Escondido, CA and hashed out the direction for their upcoming recording - "getting ready to play" as Clapton called it.  I thought it was somewhat noteworthy as I get down that way in North County, San Diego quite often to visit my parents, having even done a gig there.

Me and Mr. JohnsonThe other sample of musical coolness is Eric's Me and Mr. Johnson.  This tribute album of Robert Johnson tunes was never meant to be released, but was originally just a way to "release the tension and just have some fun" in the studio while coming up with enough material for a "normal" commercial release.

Anything you'd like to say in closing, E.C.?

"The music scene as I look at it today is a little different from where I was growing up.  The percentages are roughly the same - 95 percent rubbish, 5 percent pure...Music survives everything, and like God, it is always present.  It needs no help, and suffers no hindrance.  It has always found me, and with God's blessing and permission, it always will" ~ Eric Clapton

ThrowBackThursday Post - Uncle Tom's Cabin Quote 

Looking back on a blog post of recent yesteryear (and bringing it over from the old website for further reference):

Recently spent some time on the road with "Uncle Tom's Cabin" by Harriet Beecher Stowe. Once I got through the first paragraph of dialect/language in it's challenging-to-understand printed form, I loved it! 

A quote from p. 158:
"Is is strange then that some tears fall on the pages of his Bible, as he lays it on the cotton bale, and with patient finger, threading his slow way from word to word, traces out its promises? Having learned late in life, Tom was but a slow reader, and passed on laboriously from verse to verse. Fortunate for him was it that the book he was intent on was one which slow reading cannot injure, - nay one whose words, like ingots of gold, seem often to need to be weighed separately, that the mind may take in their priceless value. Let us follow him a moment, as, pointing to each word, and pronouncing each half aloud, he reads, - 'Let - not -your - heart - be - troubled. In - my - Father's - house - are - many - mansions. I - go - to - prepare - a - place - for - you.'"

Book Quotes - Valerie Lawson (Life of P.L. Travers; Voice of Mary Poppins)  


After seeing the movie "Saving Mr. Banks" sometime early this year, I naturally had to put the book on which this film was based ("Mary Poppins, She Wrote: The Life of P.L. Travers" by Valerie Lawson) on my to-read list for down the road. 

Well....down the road finally came, and I recently enjoyed this read.
 
 

Quote about New York City:





And here, Ms. Travers reminds the world she doesn't "write for children". :)

ThrowBackThursday Blog - Rocket, Man! 

Looking back on a blog post of recent yesteryear (and bringing it over from the old website for further reference):

I brought the autobiography "Magnificent Desolation: The Long Journey From The Moon" with me on the latest trek in July with the HC (Hotel California) and, unbeknownst to me until after I finished it, July 17th, 2009 happened to be the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11 and the first man on the moon!  This memoir is from the guy who was actually the "2nd" man on the moon, Neil Armstrong's "sidekick", Buzz Aldrin (written along with Ken Abraham). You creative types out there might like this quote from the book:
 
"Exploring this place that had never been seen by human eyes, upon which no foot has stepped, or hand touched-was awe-inspiring.  But we had no time for philisophical musings.  Our time on the surface had been designed by Mission Control to be extremely limited-a mere two and a half hours outside the LM [Lunar Module]...We weren't trained to smell the roses or to utter life-changing aphorisms...That's why for years I have wanted NASA to fly a poet, a singer, or a journalist into space - someone who could capture the emotions of the experience and share them with the world."

Okay, who's going?!  :)